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A variation is found in The Kingis Quair, a 15th-century poem attributed to James I of Scotland, in which Cupid has three arrows: gold, for a gentle "smiting" that is easily cured; the more compelling silver; and steel, for a love-wound that never heals.complaining that so small a creature shouldn't cause such painful wounds.Although Eros is generally portrayed as a slender winged youth in Classical Greek art, during the Hellenistic period, he was increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy.During this time, his iconography acquired the bow and arrow that represent his source of power: a person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid's arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire.Cupids are a frequent motif of both Roman art and later Western art of the classical tradition.In the 15th century, the iconography of Cupid starts to become indistinguishable from the putto.In contemporary popular culture, Cupid is shown drawing his bow to inspire romantic love, often as an icon of Valentine's Day.

This last Cupid was the equivalent of Anteros, "Counter-Love," one of the Erotes, the gods who embody aspects of love.Nor hath love's mind of any judgement taste; Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.And therefore is love said to be a child Because in choice he is so oft beguiled.In Hesiod's Theogony, only Chaos and Gaia (Earth) are older.Before the existence of gender dichotomy, Eros functioned by causing entities to separate from themselves that which they already contained.

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